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What happens if regulatory policies for a business are violated? A. New business rules are created. B. Safety classes are mandated. C. Additional inspections are required. D. Fines and sanctions are applied.

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What happens if regulatory policies for a business are violated? A. New business rules are created. B. Safety classes are mandated. C. Additional inspections are required. D. Fines and sanctions are applied.

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If regulatory policies for a business are violated what happens is option D. Fines and sanctions are applied. To assess the amount of a civil penalty the judge considers issues like the seriousness of the violation, the size of the business, the benefit gained by the violation and what you did to remedy the violation.

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